Field Projects Gallery

www.fieldprojectsgallery.com
Dani Tull 
http://www.danitull.com/ 
Alois Riegl (1858-1905) the Austrian art historian, once summed up the three main purposes of art:
1. To embellish nature. 
2. To inspire it.
3. To stand forth as a rival to it. 
 
Dani Tull’s Untitled, Convergence ( 2013)  speaks freely to Riegl’s purpose of art, relating to the natural world that surrounds us.  However, it is the power of Shamanism that carries this work into a new realm as we are confronted with Tull’s spider web sculptural paintings.

The spider symbolizes power, growth, mystery and infinity.  When constructing it’s web, the spider releases a sticky silken thread into the wind. If the breeze takes the thread to a spot where it can stick then the first bridge is formed. The spider then carefully crosses, reinforcing it with a second, this process continues until a foundation is made in which the web can secure itself. By giving the spider and it’s web consideration, we can see the connection to life, that there is no past, no future- only the infinite. 

We must then continue with full confidence construct our own foundation with endless manipulation knowing that it may not stick.

Dani Tull 

http://www.danitull.com/ 

Alois Riegl (1858-1905) the Austrian art historian, once summed up the three main purposes of art:

1. To embellish nature. 
2. To inspire it.
3. To stand forth as a rival to it. 
 
Dani Tull’s Untitled, Convergence ( 2013)  speaks freely to Riegl’s purpose of art, relating to the natural world that surrounds us.  However, it is the power of Shamanism that carries this work into a new realm as we are confronted with Tull’s spider web sculptural paintings.
The spider symbolizes power, growth, mystery and infinity.  When constructing it’s web, the spider releases a sticky silken thread into the wind. If the breeze takes the thread to a spot where it can stick then the first bridge is formed. The spider then carefully crosses, reinforcing it with a second, this process continues until a foundation is made in which the web can secure itself. By giving the spider and it’s web consideration, we can see the connection to life, that there is no past, no future- only the infinite. 
We must then continue with full confidence construct our own foundation with endless manipulation knowing that it may not stick.
Rachel Ritchfordrachel.ritchford.com
G.F.W. Hegel, the early 19th century German philosopher noted that, “Where painting thinks experience, sculpture thinks identity”.
Rachel Ritchford’s paintings breathe the young human experience, vanishing fast from our present. We lean back and swing freely between the grounds of the painting. The collective memories of cloud formations as a child are in a endless game of tag with structure.
We begin to understand that though nature begins with geometry it ends with the spirit. Colour and surface are etched deep inside our eyelids just as we are struck from a stray ball on the playground.
Laying in peat moss from the blackout, slowly regaining consciousness - the mind begins to rationalize what can be taken away in a split second. The whistle blows, recess is over- but we want to play pretend longer naming each cloud as it passes us by.


Rachel Ritchford
rachel.ritchford.com


G.F.W. Hegel, the early 19th century German philosopher noted that, “Where painting thinks experience, sculpture thinks identity”.

Rachel Ritchford’s paintings breathe the young human experience, vanishing fast from our present. We lean back and swing freely between the grounds of the painting. The collective memories of cloud formations as a child are in a endless game of tag with structure.

We begin to understand that though nature begins with geometry it ends with the spirit. Colour and surface are etched deep inside our eyelids just as we are struck from a stray ball on the playground.

Laying in peat moss from the blackout, slowly regaining consciousness - the mind begins to rationalize what can be taken away in a split second. The whistle blows, recess is over- but we want to play pretend longer naming each cloud as it passes us by.

Hello everyone! First of all, happy Friday (TGIF - am I right?) Secondly, stop by to say Hi and see the last day of the show MOMENTO MORI. Lastly, don’t forget to check out the online exhibition HERE.
Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to see the show, to Deborah Brown and to the artists!

Here is the press release from the show and a little about Deborah Brown:
Throughout human history, cultures and peoples have made monuments to celebrate, commemorate, memorialize, remember and insure the survival of their values as a civilization. The artists in Memento Mori (from the Latin, “remember that you will die”) examine the iconography of the monument from a contemporary vantage point. The work takes many forms: heraldic crests (Brian Guidry), totems (Wade Schaming), mapping and marking (Jean Paul Gomez), text-as-structure (Alex O’Neal), funeral mounds (Heidi Lau), hieroglyphic collage (M.A. Papanek-Miller), photo-documentation-hagiography (Julie Ann Nagle), distilled and repurposed remnants (Laura Judkis), surreal architecture-in-landscape renderings (Colleen Cunningham) and retro sci-fi structures (Ben Pranger). These ten artists employ form and craft in the service of a spooky narrative, at times archeological, psychological or metaphysical.  Mixing references to art history and popular culture, the works present a fresh take on familiar forms.  Together they form a kind of “momento mori,” an elegy to something past or lost to which the artist and the artwork pays tribute. 
The curator wishes to thank Field Projects for the opportunity to curate a show in their well-regarded program.  Sincere thanks as well to all the artists who submitted work for consideration. The level was extremely high and many different shows could have been assembled from the submissions. After reviewing nearly 3500 images, I have chosen work by artists completely unknown to me. The theme was suggested by the work submitted, around which I thought an interesting show might be assembled.  The show has surprised me, and I hope it will introduce fresh voices to the scene.
Deborah Brown is an artist, gallerist and Bushwick gadfly. She is a board member of NURTUREart, BRIC Artist Advisory Council and Community Board #4 in Bushwick where she serves as chair of the Arts and Culture Committee. Her work is represented by Lesley Heller Workspace.  In addition to her art practice, she owns and directs the gallery Storefront Ten Eyck to show the work of emerging Bushwick artists and to revisit the work of established artists.


****P.S. The gallery will be close all of August. So keep a look out come September for a wonderful Fall kick off to the art season! 

Hello everyone! First of all, happy Friday (TGIF - am I right?) Secondly, stop by to say Hi and see the last day of the show MOMENTO MORI. Lastly, don’t forget to check out the online exhibition HERE.

Thanks to everyone who has taken the time to see the show, to Deborah Brown and to the artists!

Here is the press release from the show and a little about Deborah Brown:

Throughout human history, cultures and peoples have made monuments to celebrate, commemorate, memorialize, remember and insure the survival of their values as a civilization. The artists in Memento Mori (from the Latin, “remember that you will die”) examine the iconography of the monument from a contemporary vantage point. The work takes many forms: heraldic crests (Brian Guidry), totems (Wade Schaming), mapping and marking (Jean Paul Gomez), text-as-structure (Alex O’Neal), funeral mounds (Heidi Lau), hieroglyphic collage (M.A. Papanek-Miller), photo-documentation-hagiography (Julie Ann Nagle), distilled and repurposed remnants (Laura Judkis), surreal architecture-in-landscape renderings (Colleen Cunningham) and retro sci-fi structures (Ben Pranger). These ten artists employ form and craft in the service of a spooky narrative, at times archeological, psychological or metaphysical.  Mixing references to art history and popular culture, the works present a fresh take on familiar forms.  Together they form a kind of “momento mori,” an elegy to something past or lost to which the artist and the artwork pays tribute.
 

The curator wishes to thank Field Projects for the opportunity to curate a show in their well-regarded program.  Sincere thanks as well to all the artists who submitted work for consideration. The level was extremely high and many different shows could have been assembled from the submissions. After reviewing nearly 3500 images, I have chosen work by artists completely unknown to me. The theme was suggested by the work submitted, around which I thought an interesting show might be assembled.  The show has surprised me, and I hope it will introduce fresh voices to the scene.


Deborah Brown is an artist, gallerist and Bushwick gadfly. She is a board member of NURTUREart, BRIC Artist Advisory Council and Community Board #4 in Bushwick where she serves as chair of the Arts and Culture Committee. Her work is represented by Lesley Heller Workspace.  In addition to her art practice, she owns and directs the gallery Storefront Ten Eyck to show the work of emerging Bushwick artists and to revisit the work of established artists.

****P.S. The gallery will be close all of August. So keep a look out come September for a wonderful Fall kick off to the art season! 

ESTHER RUIZ 
http://www.estherruiz.com

Esther Ruiz’s sculptures combine rough concrete and cement with the smooth surface of plexiglass and polished stone. The materials oscillate between referencing nature, man, and machine. (A sci-fi trifecta!) Though most of these sculptures are small enough to fit in your hand, they appear to be whole landscapes. Thus, the sculptures have a dynamic push and pull between object hood and being an entire world. And what kind of world do these sculptures encapsulate? That question is perhaps the most fun part of looking at Esther’s work. 

Currently, Esther’s work is up at +81 Gallery as a part of their show Human Machinery until August 16th. Make sure to stop by! 
And keep an eye out for more of Esther’s upcoming events! ::

- Artbridge Public Art Installation Gowanus
  Opening reception Wednesday August 27, 6-8pm, through 2015
  365 Bond Street, Brooklyn, NY
  (Large images of Esther’s sculptures will be displayed on a construction
  site and the opening will have food trucks!)

- Fridman Gallery, Landcape Devices
  Opening reception Thursday August 28, 6-9pm, through September 5
  287 Spring Street, New York, NY

- TSA, Los Angeles, Tiger Strikes Astroid Los Angeles Grand Opening!
  Opening reception Monday September 1, 6-8pm
  440 South Broadway, Los Angeles, CA

- Artbridge Chelsea Opening
  526 West 26th Street, 5D
  Opening reception Thursday September 11th, 6-8pm
  (Works on view from public art installation)

- MoMA PS1: NY Art Book Fair
  September 26-28, Preview Thursday September 25, 6-9pm
  Kayrock Screenprinting Booth
  Signed and number limited edition silkscreen prints available)

- American Center for Physics
  Time Exposed, curated by Sarah Tanguy
  Through October 10th
  One Physics Ellipse, College Park, MD

Brian Willmont
http://www.brianwillmont.com/
The mind goes through a series of algorithms when confronted with abstraction. We begin with what we know, or at least, what we think we know. Quickly we grapple with things like, memory, color, relationships between lines and objects, materials and our emotions among other rationalities. Critiquing quietly in our minds we begin to form a relationship with what we are experiencing. Beginning to decide if we want to create a special file to reference later, perhaps as we are drifting off to sleep into a slumber of sweet dreams.
Brian Willmont’s Paper Airplanes series of ink on folded paper emphasizes the entanglement of the mind with the world and the phenomena surrounding it. The hybridization of this work makes you want to grab it impulsivity, to line up the folds, can and will this piece of paper fly? Encountering this work with extreme impulse control the mind and body begin to rest and to see and remember the truths. This work is colored ink on paper folded or not folded into the recording of a paper airplane, then folded flat again to dry.
Brian states,  “Dancing on the edge of gaudy decoration, vividly patterned compositions are designed to entrance the viewer (like a siren), disguising and distorting violence. Working in volume like series, repeating symbols and imagery in painting, sculpture, video to create a multi leveled reality from the dialog between works which create further complexities and narratives when exhibited creating installations that bring the energy of the work into the atmosphere and allow endless interpretations of the work. While colorful and energetic, the works are full of quiet unrest - expectant and somber as history repeats its self.”

Just as the Rorschach inkblot tests challenge our perceptions using psychological interpretation, these works question our visual thinking process and challenge our impulses.

Brian Willmont

http://www.brianwillmont.com/

The mind goes through a series of algorithms when confronted with abstraction. We begin with what we know, or at least, what we think we know. Quickly we grapple with things like, memory, color, relationships between lines and objects, materials and our emotions among other rationalities. Critiquing quietly in our minds we begin to form a relationship with what we are experiencing. Beginning to decide if we want to create a special file to reference later, perhaps as we are drifting off to sleep into a slumber of sweet dreams.

Brian Willmont’s Paper Airplanes series of ink on folded paper emphasizes the entanglement of the mind with the world and the phenomena surrounding it. The hybridization of this work makes you want to grab it impulsivity, to line up the folds, can and will this piece of paper fly? Encountering this work with extreme impulse control the mind and body begin to rest and to see and remember the truths. This work is colored ink on paper folded or not folded into the recording of a paper airplane, then folded flat again to dry.

Brian states,
“Dancing on the edge of gaudy decoration, vividly patterned compositions are designed to entrance the viewer (like a siren), disguising and distorting violence. Working in volume like series, repeating symbols and imagery in painting, sculpture, video to create a multi leveled reality from the dialog between works which create further complexities and narratives when exhibited creating installations that bring the energy of the work into the atmosphere and allow endless interpretations of the work. While colorful and energetic, the works are full of quiet unrest - expectant and somber as history repeats its self.”

Just as the Rorschach inkblot tests challenge our perceptions using psychological interpretation, these works question our visual thinking process and challenge our impulses.

Also up in Chelsea, right now:

For her third solo exhibition at Murray Guy, Patricia Esquivias presents 111-119 Generalísimo/Castellana, a video and installation that navigates through a series of tenuous coincidences surrounding a block of five buildings erected in Madrid in the late 1950’s on what was Avenida del Generalísimo (after Franco) and was later renamed Paseo de la Castellana.

The exhibition is shaped by a continually expanding narrative of interconnections made by the artist, linking biographical elements and memories to inventions and archive material. Originally ceramic murals, visible from street level, were created for each of the balconies in the buildings. Each mural depicted a different European city in order “to help spread the mood that Spain was a more open and international country” during the closed and repressive regime of Francisco Franco. In 111-119 Generalísimo/Castellana, Esquivias meanders through disparate testimonies of the remodeling of the buildings’ interior and exterior. Over time many of the murals were either removed or the balcony was enclosed. Central to the story is Esquivias herself. Through performative and processual narration she investigates the circumstances of the buildings’ architect, Miguel Artíñano, his relationship to the muralists, and the mythologies that have been handed down from generation to generation.

In the video Esquivias sings the chorus of two popular songs that are about the Puerta de Alcalá, which is illustrated on a recently discarded mural that she salvaged. She also collected mosaics from one apartment and worked with jeweler Marc Monzó to make pieces to “wear the building”. The jewelry is on display in the gallery along with various materials seen in the video including: contemporary photographs of the remaining murals, the Artíñano family tree, additional photographs of some of the individuals implicated within the narrative, and comprehensive texts written by Esquivias about each of these elements.

Esquivias’ tangential investigation of Miguel Artíñano brought upon a complimentary publication, The World According to Patricia Esquivias was recently published by The Office, Berlin, in collaboration with Akademie Schloss Solitude, which presents photographs and drawings of distinctive work by the architect Fernando Garrido.

Patricia Esquivias (b. 1979) lives and works in Madrid, Spain. Recently she had solo exhibitions at Kunsthalle Winterthur, Switzerland and at MARCO, Vigo, Spain. In 2011, she was the subject of a solo exhibition at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles and in 2009 at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, and Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis. She has been included in numerous group shows including Before Our Eyes: Other Cartographies of the Rif, MACBA, Barcelona (2014), Objects in Mirror are Closer than they Appear, Tate Modern, London (2012), Personal Histories, MOCAD, Detroit, The Generational: Younger Than Jesus, New Museum, New York (2009), Report on Probability, Kunsthalle Basel (2009), and When Things Cast No Shadow - The 5th Berlin Biennial (2008). In 2007, she was awarded the Illy Present-Future Award at Artissima, Turin.

111-119 Generalísimo/Castellana was originally commissioned by Frieze Film in 2012.

For more information or images, please contact the gallery at +1-212-463-7372 or info@murrayguy.com.

DRISCOLL BABCOCK GALLERIES presents In Between Daysa group exhibition featuring artists whose works are situated in the liminal spaces between memory and loss, dreams and reality, the scientific and the spiritual, the present and the past. Through explorations that push the bounds of their artistic practices, Leonardo Benzant, Michael Maxwell, Jennifer Packer, Kara Rooney, and Luke Whitlatch express the universality contained within individual phenomena.

Jennifer Packer’s lyrical paintings challenge the divisions between realism and abstraction.  As her figures are broken down, foreground merges into background and figures merge into space, forcing the viewer to acknowledge the multitudes of meanings and contradictions not only within her works, but within society as a whole. Luke Whitlatch’s whimsical, flight-like abstractions likewise evade any absolute reading, instead exploring how memories change over time. The artist calls upon specific events from his past as a starting point, which are reinvented and retold, exaggerated and embellished, until they take on a life of their own.

In a parallel manner, Kara Rooney’s delicate sculptures, from the series On Moving Farther Away from Speech, or Hindsight is Never Twenty/Twenty, study the openly interpretative nature of language and poetry. Employing literal transformative elements (ice, water, and gas) to explore slipping memory, social interaction and actual event, she highlights how language’s inherent blind spots affect our sense of collective consciousness.

Equally influenced by the urban experience and the rituals and traditions of the non-Western world, Michael Maxwell and Leonardo Benzant create works that strive to reconnect us to a shared cultural memory. Leonardo Benzant’s sculptures from the seriesParaphernalia of the Urban Shaman M:5, are inspired by African power-objects, such as the minkisi and makutos of the Bakongo tribe, while also visually referencing the banding patterns of chromosomes, thus fusing the spiritual with the scientific. Michael Maxwell’s Phosphenes – Phoenix for the American Republic, based on the patterns of entopic imagery experienced during deep states of brainwave activity, evoke a spontaneous higher order. Integrating their personal cosmology with the physical, spiritual, and neurological modes of indigenous communication, both artists- in their uniquely individual methods- seek a deeper understanding and exploration of a universal shared consciousness.

As we seek to marry our understanding of the internal and the external, the past and the present, the cosmic and the infinitesimal, the individual and the universal, the exhibition provides a snapshot of current artistic practices which occupy this realm of in-betweens. Where language fails, these artists establish a discourse between the experiences that inform our personal identity and the collective conscious, the endless stream of images and figures that are swept into the subconscious, and the anomalies of the brain which together shape our personal and cultural narratives.  

Summer hours (beginnning July 11): Monday-Thursday, 10AM-6PM; Friday, 10AM-5PM

Heidi Lau, Show #21: Memento Mori

The Fortress

Mandala (In Progress)


Mandala detail

"The driving force behind my work is to create an alternate world that comprises excerpted and fragmented narratives from personal and cultural memories, fables and natural history. Through creating ceramic artifacts that take the form of various objects of remembrance out of clay –funeral monuments, fossilized creatures and religious objects, I strive to suggest the existence of a mythical world in a non-linear manner."

Exceprt from Heidi Lau’s artist statement. 
To check out more of Heidi’s work go to her website:
http://heidilau.org

Lisha Bia


http://lishabai.com/

Art historian and Art critic, James Elkins once broke it down that most of the visual arts basically negotiate the relationship between water and stone.  Sand, as a material couldn’t be more poetic to this notion.  We commonly recognize it as the loose granular substance placed between our toes where water and land meet.  This natural erosion is a space between movement and stillness.

Lisha Bai’s sand rotation work pushes and pulls, the sand floats and dissolves into a tracing of abstraction.  The end piece is the result of Bai’s physical action stopped in time.  We understand how fragile the work began, only to fully feel its impact layer by layer kept safe behind plexiglas. 

Lisha Bai states:

Drawing from everyday encounters with paper towels, checkered vinyl floors and screen savers, my work transforms quotidian visual happenings into experiential objects that explore the sensory and temporal aspects of architectural and abstract space.

We turn to Lisha Bai’s sand rotations to gain a sense of meditative tranquility from our over-stimulated lives.  The work reminds us to unplug and breathe deeply. 

Ben Pranger, Show #21: Memenot Mori

Ben Pranger’s piece Thing of Holes looks like a monument to retro science fiction. An apocalyptic land where man is set against nature. This piece sets pixelated order versus the chaos of destruction. Though, I think this sculpture is in dialogue with more than the visual tropes of sci-fi. In the context of this show, this piece becomes a monument to the failure of what ‘monument’ means. It points out the irony in the act of erecting a permanent structure on the inherently transient earth (which also falsely implies the permanence of human life). Thus, this piece bolsters the sentiment, “memento mori,” for which this show was named for. 

Check out more of Ben Pranger’s work at:
http://benpranger.com

Colleen Cunningham, Show #21: Memento Mori

Colleen Cunningham’s piece The Sixth Dimension is a part of a series of paper collages that focuses on the relationship between the different representations of landscapes and space. Colleen, as stated in her artist statement, “uses collage to juxtapose ‘manmade’ landscapes and figures (usually from classical American and British paintings), with ‘natural’ landscapes, as well as constructed objects and spaces.” 


Cunningham is interested in how one, “can reconcile these locations and spaces in our minds as a part of a larger representation of the vast landscape of our conscious experience.” And therefore she strives for her pieces to be a, “subtle nod to the many ways in which we orient ourselves in the universe and how those perspectives coexist.” I think this sentiment not only resonates in her work, but also is a unifying thread to the theme of this group show. I think monuments have often been used as a way to make a lasting mark, an index of ourselves. In other words, monuments are a way to externally orient ourselves as both separate and a part of the rest of the universe. 

Check out more of Colleen Cunningham’s work at:
http://www.colleencunningham.net

ALEX O’NEAL

Show #21: Memento Mori presents a series of idiosyncratic interpretations of monuments, and I think Alex O’Neal’s drawing series Shrine for Ice Cream Royalty stands out as especially so.  

In the complexly layered world of each drawing, “wreaths, words made of flowers, shields, badges, sashes, pine cones, ears of corn, peppermint donuts, vintage phones, and neck ties (among other things) are in tall, cluttered arrangements. Commemorations of ‘Flea Market Superstar,’ ‘Sellout,’ ‘Marion Jail Fan Club,’ and ‘Yonkers Nursing Home’ are - as banners state - ‘At Rest,’ ‘Beloved,’ and ‘In Loving Memory.’ Almost buried in these decorative showcases are the totemic, bling-draped Ice Cream Royalty. Personages of sorts, they are crown-wearing, multi-scoop stacked cones, inhabited by sleepy shrine groupies that hold to disconnected phone receivers and lick at melting, sugary surfaces.”

As O’Neal poetically states in his artist statement, there are towers of ice cream scoops where (upon closer inspection) small sleepy human faces emerge, licking the ice cream structures they inhabit. The ‘Ice Cream Royalty’ references those seduced by fleeting pleasure and glory of awards etc.
The juxtaposition of these towers with the epitaphic text implies that these words sustain us in grief just as ice cream does. They keep us feeling high but don’t really nourish us; don’t curb our hunger. These sayings, personal memorials, and ice cream scoops are all fleeting - but the endurance of the series of drawings allows us to appreciate the beauty in transience and loss.  

 

Check out more of his work at
http://www.alexoneal.com

Julie Ann Nagle, Show #21: Memento Mori

 

The word ‘monument’ conjures images of the far past. Julie Ann Nagle’s photograph “Modern Studio” plays with the conventions of monument and complicates it. Nagle’s piece takes on the visual tropes of an archival photo of a paleolithic dig’s artifacts or perhaps a documentation of Brancusi’s modernist studio. But she then confounds that reading by the contents of her photograph - her own contemporary sculpture. There is a dynamic mix of graphic and organic materials, textures, shapes, and references. On the floor is a circle of rocks, to the right is a life-size Cycladic figure, and just feet from that is a photo of Madonna in her cone bra mounted atop a pedestal with her flat arm jutting out into space. 

I think her piece’s place in art history also juts out. Or in other words, her piece both monumentalizes and parodies art history. Her idiosyncratic sculptures reference both pop culture (in Madonna and the leaning tower of records) and art history (Minimalism’s repetition, Modernist form, and prehistoric figuration). It’s almost as if a series of monuments to different art historical periods came together to pose for a group photo. I think that a group photo really speaks to what it means to make a contemporary monument. And furthermore, the collision of her group of sculptures with the visual tropes of historical documentation makes for a dynamic, richly layered piece.

Check out more of her work at her website:
http://www.julieannnagle.com